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Tag Archive 'alice munro'

Vandals

Well, that was scandalous. And uncomfortable. In reading “Vandals” I came to understand a few things. 1. There is a lot of death in this story. 2. There is a hint of pedophilia in this story. 3. There’s a case of breaking, entering, and vandalizing in this story. After realizing these things, I began to wonder, […]

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Different and Wonderful

The complexities of Munro’s short story “Differently” are brilliant. Their is a perfect example of character development presented in this tale. Munro tells the story in Georgia’s point of view, but readers are given equal opportunity to see and understand the major and minor characters. We’re given different time spans, and different social classes to […]

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POV in “Meneseteung”

Probably the most noticeable aspect of “Meneseteung” is the way Munro weaves together the story’s point of view and structure. The tight structure, clearly delineated by numbering and introductory snippets from Almeda’s poems, allows Munro to make point-of-view shifts without reader confusion–aside from the confusion she intentionally invokes, which I would call a good kind […]

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Munro’s “Differently”

Georgia once took a creative-writing course, and what the instructor told her was: Too many things. Too many things going on at the same time; also too many people. Think, he told her. What is the important thing? What do you want us to pay attention to? Think. (p. 498) I certainly understand where the […]

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Vandals – 5/6 Blog

In Alice Munro’s Vandals, women needing to hold on to the men emotionally seem to be a huge aspect of this story. Bea creeped me out with her honesty, as well as her willful denial of what was going on. “…what she did think that some women, women like herself, might always be on the […]

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A Generation of Women

Munro’s story “White Dump” is told in third-person omniscient point-of-view, and Munro cleverly creates transitions that transport the reader into three different characters’ minds. Each narrative is told with delicate care in that the events presented, or rather the main event, is told in different experiences holding in it complex character development. There is also something […]

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“Fits”

 The two people who died were in their early sixties. . . . (p. 429) We talked last class about beginning with the most unbelievable detail of a story. That way, the reader has to believe it. In “Fits,” Alice Munro does this by leading with the death of the Weebles. Then she goes back […]

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“Moons of Jupiter” by Munro

Some of Alice Munro’s titles confuse me. For example, I had a hard time understanding why she chose the title “Dulse” for Lydia’s story when the seaweed seemed like such a minor detail. In the case of “The Moons of Jupiter,” however, I find it easy to see the title’s significance. Every aspect of the […]

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“Dulse”, Alice Munro

Alice Munro’s writing style in her short story “Dulse” introduced me to an entirely new perception of how fiction writing doesn’t always have to answer every question the reader has about the story. Munro’s sentence structures were quite short, simple and even choppy at some points in the story. I found a certain beauty in […]

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Munro’s “Dulse”

What first struck me about Munro’s “Dulse” was the varying length and complexity of the sentences. For most of the story, the sentences are rather short and choppy-sounding, or Munro constructs them to sound repetitive. For instance, the repeated format of “He __ed, he ___ed” at the top of p. 263: When she had been […]

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Dynamics in Dulse

Munro’s short story “Dulse” incorporates a  couple of different scenes that refer to the past. As I went through this incredible roller coaster Munro created, I found the scene with Lydia and her doctor to be the most intense, and overall the best scene in “Dulse”. It seems as if Lydia is a different person […]

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Strout and Munro

Beginning with Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge and the short stories “A Little Burst” and “Starving,” I found it really amazing how differently the two were presented.  In “A Little Burst” the story is written from Olive’s point-of-view in present tense. Present tense point-of-view tends to be difficult for me to write because out of habit I […]

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Material

The first thing a reader notices about this story is the title: “Material.” I didn’t understand how this title related to the story until the end, when the narrator says, “I was thinking I would tell him how strange it was for me to realize that we shared, still shared, the same bank of memory, […]

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When I consider Alice Munro’s “Something I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You,” the word that comes immediately to my mind is subtle. Every scene changes my understanding of the characters, their thoughts, and their relationships, almost always without outright stating any of these things. That was a look she would like to have described to […]

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One aspect I can’t help noticing in both Elizabeth Strout’s “Incoming Tide” and Alice Munro’s “Postcard” is the way they divulge information. In my own writing, I often find myself thinking that I should give an introduction early on in my stories, addressing the reader’s questions about who these people are and what their relationships […]

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Alice Munro

Alice Munro has a unique style of writing. For both of her short stories “Walker Brothers Cowboy” and “Dance of the Happy Shades” it seems that she has placed her characters in situations where they are on journeys of discovery, and simply reading the characters’ reactions to the scenes unfolding is magic. Though her characters […]

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For me, the most immediately obvious aspect of “Walker Brothers Cowboy” was Alice Munro’s rich sensory details in every scene. Instead of reciting dry facts about the time period or about the poverty of Tuppertown, for example, Munro lingers over a walk to the store with her mother. In that scene, the mother’s dignified, formal […]

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